Triglav National Park

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This is the only national park in Slovenia. It is staggeringly beautiful and so demands special treatment. This national park in the area of the Julian Alps in north-western Slovenia gained its name from Slovenia’s highest mountain, Triglav, which stands 2,864 metres high. Countless natural and cultural features are dotted around the diverse karstic mountain terrain with its picturesque mountain peaks and valleys, and there is ample opportunity for activities in the natural environment and for active leisure time.

Protected Slovenian land

Triglav National Park (TNP) covers 838 square kilometres by the border with Italy and Austria, accounting for four percent of Slovenia’s entire territory. It is almost entirely covered by the Eastern Julian Alps. It is the biggest protected area in the country, and has the status of a special protected area, which is stricter than in other landscape parks in Slovenia. This means very limited scope for building tourist infrastructure, in order for the park to maintain its most unspoilt quality, while at the same time it enables many people to enjoy its beauty.

This area ranks among the oldest parks in Europe. It was first protected in 1924, when an Alpine protection park was established. It was officially renamed Triglav National Park in 1961, but this only encompassed the close surroundings of Mt. Triglav and the Triglav lakes. The park acquired its current area in 1981.

Magnificent two-thousanders


The majority of Slovenia’s 400 two-thousand metre mountains lie within Triglav National Park. Views of them are simply enchanting. Alongside Triglav, which in clear weather can be seen from virtually all parts of the country, there are the mighty peaks of Mangart, Jalovec, Prisojnik and Špik.

The park falls within the high mountain karst regions. Forests cover a full two thirds of the surface area. On the southern side they are predominantly beech, and on the north spruce and larch. There is a huge contour range: pointed peaks, plunging rock faces and deeply carved, glacially formed valleys.

Attractions and activities


The mountains in Triglav National Park are laced with well marked and, where necessary, properly secured trails. Hiking is a mass activity in the summer months, while many of the more experienced mountaineers head up to the Julian peaks in winter, too. Along the way there are numerous mountain lodges and huts.

A major feature of the park is Slovenia’s biggest glacial lake – Lake Bohinj. Various water sports are popular here in the summer, while in winter, when it freezes, crowds come to ski at nearby Vogel and to ski tour.

Many other lakes are well known in the park, for instance Krnsko jezero. There are also numerous waterfalls, two of the finest being Savica and Peričnik. One of the most popular tourist attractions is the enchanting Radovna River gorge of Blejski Vintgar.

Tolmin Gorges is the lowest and southernmost access point to Triglav National Park and an extraordinary natural feature.

In the Soča River area, which also falls within the park, the most popular pastimes are high-adrenaline sports along the Soča River. Rafting and hydrospeeding are unforgettable experiences.

Chilly mountain valleys


It is especially nice to visit Triglav National Park in the summer, when other parts of the country are sweltering at 30˚ Centigrade. Average temperatures in the park in the warmest month range from 20 °C in the valleys to 5.6 °C in the mountains, and in the coldest month from 0.7 °C and – 8.8 °C. Average precipitation amounts to more than 1500 mm. There are 120 to 146 days of precipitation a year.

Recognition

Triglav National Park is administered by the TNP public institute, which ensures the protection of nature and also conducts expert and research tasks.

In 2003 the park was incorporated into the international network of biosphere areas, UNESCO’s MaB (Man and Biosphere).

In 2004 it received a diploma from the Council of Europe for protected areas with exemplary management, and in 2007 the Europa Nostra diploma as part of the European Union prizes for cultural heritage in the architectural heritage category for work done in renovating the Pocar homestead in Zgornja Radovna.

In 2008 part of the park – the Soča River area – was made Slovenia’s first European Destination of Excellence - EDEN.
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